Zen

Everyday Zen: Love and Work

Charlotte Joko Beck offers a warm, engaging, uniquely American approach to using Zen to deal with the problems of daily living—love, relationships, work, fear, ambition, and suffering. Everyday Zen shows us how to live each moment to the fullest. This Plus edition includes an interview with the author.


Zen Flesh, Zen Bones: A Collection of Zen and Pre-Zen Writings

When Zen Flesh, Zen Bones was published in 1957 it became an instant sensation with an entire generation of readers who were just beginning to experiment with Zen. Over the years it has inspired leading American Zen teachers, students, and practitioners. Its popularity is as high today as ever.

Zen Flesh, Zen Bones is a book that offers a collection of accessible, primary Zen sources so that readers can struggle over the meaning of Zen for themselves. It includes 101 Zen Stories, a collection of tales that recount actual experiences of Chinese and Japanese Zen teachers over a period of more than five centuries; The Gateless Gate, the famous thirteenth-century collection of Zen koans; Ten Bulls, a twelfth century commentary on the stages of awareness leading to enlightenment; and Centering, a 4,000 year-old teaching from India that some consider to be the roots of Zen.


The Zen Doctrine of No Mind 

Dedicated largely to the teaching of Hui Neng, this volume covers the purpose and technique of Zen training, and goes further into the depths of Zen than any other work of modern times. Here we find no reliance on scripture or a Savior, for the student is shown how to go beyond thought in order to achieve a state of consciousness beyond duality.


The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma

A fifth-century Indian Buddhist monk, Bodhidharma is credited with bringing Zen to China. Although the tradition that traces its ancestry back to him did not flourish until nearly two hundred years after his death, today millions of Zen Buddhists and students of kung fu claim him as their spiritual father.

While others viewed Zen practice as a purification of the mind or a stage on the way to perfect enlightenment, Bodhidharma equated Zen with buddhahood and believed that it had a place in everyday life. Instead of telling his disciples to purify their minds, he pointed them to rock walls, to the movements of tigers and cranes, to a hollow reed floating across the Yangtze.

This bilingual edition, the only volume of the great teacher’s work currently available in English, presents four teachings in their entirety. “Outline of Practice” describes the four all-inclusive habits that lead to enlightenment, the “Bloodstream Sermon” exhorts students to seek the Buddha by seeing their own nature, the “Wake-up Sermon” defends his premise that the most essential method for reaching enlightenment is beholding the mind. The original Chinese text, presented on facing pages, is taken from a Ch’ing dynasty woodblock edition.


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